Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search
Forum Scope


Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Please confirm you want to mark all posts read

Mark all topics read

sp_MobileMenu Actions
Avatar
Guest
Not logged in

New/Updated Topics

Select Forum

sp_TopicIcon
isolating alcove without adding walls...
Avatar
Posts: 12
February 5, 2021 - 1:21 pm

1sp_QuotePost

Hi,

My name is John. I'm new here.

I have been watching Acoustic Field videos for a long time. I have a small home recording studio that I have recently been trying to improve, i.e. I seem to have more time for it now that I am working from home due to covid-19 precautions. I currently have no room treatments to speak of, because most of my money went into "sound-proofing" so that my upstairs neighbor does not begin hating me. However, with that work mostly done, I am beginning to work on maximizing the space for sound playback.

Here is my first question(s)...

My room is mostly used for editing/mixing/mastering recordings of my band, and a secondary use is recording drums. The room is rectangular, with the exception of a decent sized alcove on one of the side walls. Not including the alcove, the main part of the room is 1402 cu.ft., which just puts the room into the red on the room chart. What would be the best way to isolate this alcove with temporary/moveable barriers so that I can better achieve a simple rectangular listening space? Would hanging sound blankets be sufficient? How would I then treat the alcove to lesson its return effect, even with it being somewhat cut off from the main part of the room? I know what I am asking will not completely cut off that alcove, but I would like to make the situation as good as possible without construction.

Thanks,
John

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 5, 2021 - 1:47 pm

2sp_QuotePost

just some more info on the room...

I have two sets of near-field monitor/sub combos in the room that I do not believe are overpowering the space.

1) Yamaha NS10M/Yamaha A100A stereo amp, Yamaha NS-W2 (active) subwoofer all routed through an Ashly XR1001 crossover.
2) Tannoy PBM 6.5/Samson Servo 550 stereo amp, Tannoy TS10 (active) subwoofer all routed through an Ashly XR1001 crossover.

The rectangular part of the room is 14'10" (L) x 13'7" (W) x 7' (H - drop ceiling)/ 7'9" (H - truss subfloor)

I hope that give enough info for some basic recommendations on dealing with that alcove, so I can square up the main listening area.

Thanks again,
John

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 5, 2021 - 2:12 pm

3sp_QuotePost

Sorry... one more thing...

This was a blanket I was looking at... https://acousticalsolutions.co.....d-blanket/

I was thinking of hanging a few of them, and I can put them in a closet when I'm not using the studio gear.

Thanks,
again.

Avatar
Posts: 447
February 6, 2021 - 6:15 am
4sp_QuotePost

Blankets are sound absorbing "technologies". They do nothing for noise transmission.

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 6, 2021 - 9:47 am

5sp_QuotePost

Thank you Dennis

Would my concept of a temporary/movable barrier to separate the alcove from the main portion of the room even be possible with the right materials? I am not so much concerned about sound passing through and bouncing around the alcove... at this stage I mostly want to have a more straightforward room shape to mix in, with predictable reflection points.

What approach/material(s) might I need to consider?

Thanks,
John

Avatar
Posts: 447
February 6, 2021 - 10:09 am
6sp_QuotePost

Fill out the information in this link. https://www.acousticfields.com.....-analysis/

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 6, 2021 - 1:06 pm

7sp_QuotePost

Hi Dennis,

I went through your link and I got to the last question... at present I do lack the resources to do anything significant, so I think I'll need to stick to the forums and maybe incrementally make whatever improvements I can based on the feedback I receive. I'll take even small improvements at this point in time.

Is there a way to post images beside the permalink method?

Thanks,
John

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 11, 2021 - 3:24 pm

8sp_QuotePost

Hi,

Here is an interesting paper on "Low frequency sound propagation in activated carbon" - https://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/.....1239_1.pdf

I have a question about using a suspended ceiling and the above truss subfloor as a massive bass trap for treating a smaller room with a low ceiling... can it be done?

John

Avatar
Posts: 447
February 12, 2021 - 5:30 am
9sp_QuotePost

The floor to ceiling dimension creates the 50 - 70 Hz. fundamental issues that low ceiling heights produce. Treating the floor or ceiling is a good start. Depending on the amplitude of the issue, you may need to treat both. With diaphragmatic absorption , you have a heavy absorber that can weigh 20 - 30 lbs. / sq. ft. Hanging this weight from a ceiling is an issue. If you can not treat the ceiling due to the weight issue, treat the floor by building a platform. https://www.acousticfields.com.....-platform/

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 12, 2021 - 4:10 pm

10sp_QuotePost

Hi,

Would it be better to just rip out the drop ceiling and install drywall (or something better) directly to the truss subfloor... thus making an new ceiling that would be approx. 7'10" high? Would that little bit of difference, from 7' (to the drop ceiling) to a possible 7'10" ceiling (mounted directly to above subfloor directly) worth the effort. (I'm trying to get myself to a better room size before I go crazy with room treatment.)

Also, with respect to activated carbon... is there such a thing as "audio grade" that can be purchased on the open market? I watched one of your videos and some guy treating a really small mix room by building his own low frequency boxes... and he used activated carbon that looked to be pellet size. Was that purchased from you? I am open to building my own low frequency boxes once I get the room size issue addressed to the best dimensions I can take it.

(another question... is it possible to use an alcove that is partially partitioned off as a large bass trap? ...basically the idea is to suck out the low frequency room issues I am expecting? You mentioned in one of your videos that having an open door could really let out a lot a sound pressure.... what if that alcove space was used to house a massive low frequency box? - not sure if that question even makes sense, but it was a thought I was having. lol)

John

Avatar
Posts: 447
February 13, 2021 - 6:20 am
11sp_QuotePost

Noise transmission issues must be measured first and foremost. Adding material types without knowing the frequency and amplitude of the noise is guessing and guessing never works with noise. Our carbon technology is proprietary and is available for install in our DIY/BDA units. Contact us at info@acousticfields.com for ordering instructions.

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 19, 2021 - 11:09 am

12sp_QuotePost

I will try the DIY/DBA once I have measured the room. In anticipation of some big low freq. absorption cabs, I have been clearing out some old gear from room along the wall perimeter all around. Literally whittling things down in the room to just my control desk/speakers/equipment rack/one amp and my drum kit in the back half of the room.

I have a ceiling height question..... In my room, where I have the drop ceiling height located at 7'-0" feet, is that the ceiling height that I should use when considering room acoustics? or should I think of the ceiling height as being realistically located above the drop ceiling, at the truss/subfloor level above it? (...which is about 8'-6") It seems to me that the drop ceiling might almost be non-existent to the low frequencies issues I am expecting. Just trying to theorize how I might be able to use the drop ceiling to some advantage during the treatment phase, and possibly add some isolation to the truss/subfloor at the same time.

Thanks,
John

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 19, 2021 - 11:16 am

13sp_QuotePost

Sorry if my question seems to be a repeat of an earlier question. I'm just trying to visualize what I might be looking at with regard to the ceiling.

Thanks again,
John

Avatar
Posts: 447
February 19, 2021 - 11:19 am
14sp_QuotePost

The drop ceiling has no impact on low frequencies. It has a negative impact on middle and high frequencies. I would remove it.

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 20, 2021 - 10:25 am

15sp_QuotePost

Soooo, my wife said no to losing the drop ceiling.Smile

I had this thought... can I put in ceiling tiles that keep the look, but that have no isolation or absorption qualities - thus letting all the sound waves pass through, and then treat the space between the drop ceiling and the subfloor above as needed. Basically, the ceiling tiles would be the "cloth" cover of the above isolation and absorption materials. It would give me a 8'10" ceiling height (to the plywood subfloor above) and treatment/absorption would fall between the 7' high drop ceiling and the 8'10" high plywood subfloor. I would also mean using a technology that would fit between the truss subfloor joists. Sound isolation might suffer, but could this space make for effective treatment?

Could this work?

Thanks,
John

Avatar
Posts: 447
February 20, 2021 - 10:42 am
16sp_QuotePost

Yes, you create a diaphragmatic absorber for low frequency absorption . You will need 10" of depth to absorb down to 30 Hz.

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 20, 2021 - 11:18 am

17sp_QuotePost

Besides the small room size... I need to keep the finished basement intact in case we sell this place. So I am looking at building all modular treatments that I can take with me if we move... even the stuff I put above the drop ceiling.

Once I am ready to take all the measurements, I'll submit the data to your online form and see what solutions you can develop for my space. I would be going the DIY/DBA route.

Thanks again,
John

Avatar
Posts: 447
February 20, 2021 - 11:29 am
18sp_QuotePost

Barrier technology to reduce noise transmissions is a permanent build. You can not take it with you. It becomes part of the structure. BDA units are for sound absorption . They do not work for noise transmission.

Avatar
Posts: 12
February 20, 2021 - 12:24 pm

19sp_QuotePost

The absorption and isolation parts I understand. I was thinking that whatever absorption design I end up using to treat the area, even if its something I mount above the drop ceiling, I could unmount it and take it with me if I move. As far as sound isolation...It seems I am pretty limited with what I can do because the construction in the home is already done. I'm mostly talking about absorption and room treatment at this point, based on what my sound measurements reveal.

As a side question... does activated carbon ever clog up when used for sound absorption , like it does when used in water and air purification applications?

John

Avatar
Posts: 447
February 20, 2021 - 12:37 pm
20sp_QuotePost

Our carbon technology is proprietary for sound. We treat it to minimize moisture retention.

Forum Timezone:
America/Los_Angeles
Most Users Ever Online: 99
Currently Online: tomweb
Guest(s) 2
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Devices in use: Desktop (1), Phone (2)

Forum Stats:
Groups: 4
Forums: 10
Topics: 439
Posts: 1181
Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 25
Members: 16317
Moderators: 0
Admins: 2