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Drum Practice Room with in Brick Garage
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June 24, 2016
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June 24, 2016 - 1:38 pm
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I live in the uk in a detached brick cavity wall type house with an attached single brick garage which is attached to my neighbours garage (their house is a mirror image to mine where the garages touch). The garage is narrow but long approx 2.7m x 8m with a big garage door at one end and has a solid concrete floor. I want to create a drum practice room within the back half of the garage 2.7m x 4m. I want the specification of it to reduce noise enough just so that I can practice with out disturbing the neighbours and my family in my house. It doesn’t need to be a professional sound studio level of noise reduction but enough that I can practice drums without disturbing my sleeping kids in the evening etc. I’ve been watching videos and reading material and understand the type and arrangement of the barrier technology depends on usage of the room. What is the best combination of barrier technology for a drum practice room? I am currently thinking a room with in a room i.e. A stud wall inset within the garage brick walls (and another stud wall where we cut the garage in half were no outer wall exists). For the frequencies of a drum kit (low bass 30Hz to high cymbals 10kHz) what barrier technology/combination is best for the inner stud wall and outer stud/brick wall? Add double dry wall, green glue, mass loaded vinyl, rock wool etc on resilient channels? Should the outer brick wall require any barriers or will the brick be sufficient as the outer barrier to get the acceptable level of noise reduction? I believe the solid concrete floor should be good for the bass drum with some addional floating floor materials on it. Yes?

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June 30, 2016 - 3:39 pm
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Hi Andy,

The garage width is too small to support the energy from a drum of any type. Double drywall only works for frequencies above 125 Hz. Never put drywall in any music room. It destroys middle range frequencies.

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July 5, 2016 - 7:48 am
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Dennis Foley said Never put drywall in any music room. It destroys middle range frequencies.  

Hey, Dennis!

I’d love to hear you talk a bit more about how drywall destroys midrange frequencies. In what way(s) does it do that? How would I see that manifest itself if I were tracking a rock act in my drywall-covered space (with plenty of broadband absorption )?

I had some super ugly, dated-looking, painted wood paneling in my space before nature (via some water seeping into my basement) forced me to completely renovate my room. The new drywall sounds significantly different but I couldn’t place what it was specifically – partially because I only ever heard the old space with my treatment in it. I can’t say “better” or “worse” because I didn’t get to do any sort of measurements pre wood-to-drywall conversion but it’s definitely different.

Is diffusion the best way to prevent/repair the damage caused by drywall?

Thanks for any information and thoughts you can lend, Dennis!

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July 10, 2016 - 9:34 am
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Hi Andy,

The materials you use in an audio room all contribute to the total sound perceived in the room. A room made of glass will sound different than a room made of wood. Materials do matter and more importantly, the combination of those materials really matters.

I have been building music and voice rooms for over 40 years. I know materials that when combined with others, produce a certain sound quality within the room, especially in middle and high frequency ranges. We have measured some middle and higher frequency aberrations but remember with acoustics that measurements are not everything. There are many things that can be heard but not measured.

Stay with natural materials when building audio rooms. Natural fabrics, woods, and stone. Create a balance between those materials always keeping in mind their density and structure as it pertains to the acoustic goal desired.

Diffusion takes the sound quality you have created within your room and spreads it out in a larger sound field within the room. If you give it “bad” sound, you get more “bad” sound spread out in a larger field.

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