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Barn-shaped ceiling for control room
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Forum Posts: 3
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February 18, 2017
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February 19, 2017 - 9:23 am
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I am in the design phase for building myself a home-studio in an old wooden shed in my back yard. The internal floor dimensions of the shed are 11-1/2 ft. W x 23-1/2 ft. L. The walls are 6ft. 9 in. at the top of the top wall plate and the roof is barn-shaped. 10-1/2 ft. at the center of the room and 9 ft. 3 in. at the first junction above the plate. I intend to build double walls and ceiling with an air space inside this shell to help isolate some of the noise from getting in or out. Mostly out. I intend upon building an isolation booth in one end of the room so I can put guitar amps and the Leslies for my Hammond into and use it for some storage space as well. I figure that I will lose about 10 to 12 inches in floor space around the entire perimeter of the existing structure. My reason for stating this is that the usable floor space inside will be less than the existing dimensions.

The shed has a wooden joist-style floor that is raised above ground on one end which is going to be problematic for isolation purposes. I have toyed with the idea of building another floating internal floor on top of the existing one to help with isolation issues. I realize that nothing is going to be stellar but I need to do as much as I can to help with bleed into the external environment. I live in a semi-rural neighborhood and only have one neighbor close by. There is some insignificant traffic noise so all-in-all it's pretty quiet outside.

I intend to do all of my control room monitoring through near-field monitors with 8" drivers. I may add a subwoofer eventually but I'm not really expecting to.

Building the iso booth is going to determine the length between the front and rear walls of my control room. I can make the iso booth anywhere from 6 to 8 feet in width. That will determine the length of my control room. If I make the iso-booth 8 ft. wide that will put my control room at about 15 ft. give or take. Obviously I would like the control room as big as I can get it so after I add diffusion and treatments I'll still have some floor space left. If I make the iso-booth 6 ft. wide my control room gets 2 ft. longer which would be wonderful but, I want to do what would be best acoustically for the control room.

I understand that there is nothing I can do to get the sound perfect due to size and structural limitations but, that's what I have to work with so I have to make it work. Since I haven't started the build-out yet I wanted to get as much info as I can before I start to try and avoid as many big mistakes as possible.

I have some carpentry skills and what I don't have I have friends who do that are willing to help who owe me lots of favors. I am a semi-retired machinist so I can do math and such without any issues. I will be doing primarily rock and country music here and have no intentions of recording live bands since I just don't have the space. This is going to be for me and my friends to use for musical research and development and producing our original music. Mostly mine. I don't have an unlimited budget but, have some money put aside to invest in this project. My intention is to build myself a good sounding man-cave where I can get away from everything and pursue my musical addiction without bugging anyone. I want to build it as well as I can for the money I have to spend. I already have all of the gear I would ever need so it's time to spend some money on my listening environment.

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